INTERVIEWS

THE BLOG GODDESS – Interview by Tina Marie Williams

Tina: A lot of times you hear authors say they don’t want to hear what their fans are saying because they want to continue to write the story without being influenced. [But] on so many different levels, you have to be plugged into what they’re saying [when writing tie-in fiction]. Do you feel like that makes it harder to write? Is that extra pressure?

Marcy: It is extra pressure, because I love the [Eberron] setting and I know these other fans love the setting and they love the game and I want to give them something they’re going to enjoy. I want to enhance their experience by bringing the world of the game they love to play to life for them in a way that maybe it hadn’t been before. Listen to more…

 

THE NAMELESS ZINE – Interview by Cathy Book

…She generally has about nine months to write a book and spends a good portion of that time just immersing herself in whatever genre/time period/person she’ll need for the story and then giving it time to stew in her backbrain. This immersion approach is particularly critical when she writes in someone else’s universe/property. When she was writing a D&D story, she had all the rule books spread out, and spent a lot of time reading other stories set in the D&D world. Read more…

 

CIVILIAN READER – Interview by Stefan Fergus

Stefan: Your most recent novel, Skein of Shadows, was published by Wizards of the Coast this past July. The novel is the sequel to The Shard Axe (2011). Both are set in the world of Dungeons & Dragons. How would you introduce the latest novel and series as a whole to a new reader?

Marcy: Although the books are set in the D&D world of Eberron (which is also the setting for the MMORPG, Dungeons & Dragons Online), it isn’t necessary to be familiar with the game (either tabletop or online) in order to enjoy them. The novels follow Sabira d’Deneith, a rough-and-tumble Marshal whose bad habits include drinking too much dwarven whisky, losing at cards, and consistently bringing her prisoners in a bit worse for wear. Read more…

 

DDOCAST (EPISODE 257) – Interview by Sig Trent

DDOcast: I hear you really put [Sabira] through the ringer this time. Do you ever feel bad for heaping trouble on your heroine?

Marcy: No…anybody who’s read Legacy of Wolves or The Shard Axe [knows] that I kind of take the George R. R. Martin view of things that nobody is really safe…yes, there’s a 99% chance that Sabira is going to survive, but what is she going to lose in the process? And who is she going to lose in the process? So, yes, I put her through the ringer and I don’t feel bad about it because I think it makes it a better story. Listen to more…

 

GEEK’S DREAM GIRL – Profile by Lillian Cohen-Moore

…While [Rockwell’s] work in Geotechnical Engineering hasn’t specifically come in handy on the job as a writer, it did prepare her for working in a male dominated industry.

“Once you’ve been a female engineer in charge of quality control on a construction site, having to tell a group of older, bigger, less-educated men that they whine like your six-year-old son and they’d better re-do the work or you’ll shut the project down, there’s not really too much the gaming industry can throw at you that’s going to faze you.” Read more…

 

THE FICTORIAN ERA – Interview by Colette Vernon

Colette: What has writing tie-in fiction taught you that has helped your overall writing career?

Marcy: The first and most important thing tie-in work has taught me is how to write to a deadline…there’s a reason a lot of authors’ sophomore efforts don’t live up to their debut novels, and it’s largely because they’ve never had to write on deadline before. Read more…

 

DDOCAST (EPISODE 246) – Interview by Sig Trent

DDOcast: The Shard Axe was sort of an action/detective story in a noir tradition. Will Skein of Shadows be along the same lines?

Marcy: It’s probably more of a traditional quest kind of novel, but you know I don’t really write traditional kinds of novels, so it will have some twists. Listen to more…

 

DDOCAST (EPISODE 233) – Interview by Sig Trent

DDOcast: You really dig into dwarven culture in Eberron…dwarves in fantasy have an almost entirely masculine aspect…was that something you had in mind as you were writing?

Marcy: I wanted to write strong characters, male or female. I do like to try to present strong female characters whenever I can…and I thought, ‘Who is going to be stronger than a female dwarf?’ Listen to more…

 

DDOCAST (EPISODE 205) – Interview by Sig Trent

DDOcast: Is there some advantage to writing tie-in fiction?

Marcy: A lot of people think writing tie-in fiction is easier because “all the work’s already been done,” but that is SO not the case. Your job [is] that much harder because you can’t just make up whatever you want anymore. Listen to more…

 

MASSIVELY – Interview by Rubi Bayer

Massively: Can you give us an outline of the plot of The Shard Axe?

Marcy: The Shard Axe is, broadly, the story of a Sentinel Marshal — someone who has received the highest honor House Deneith can bestow — who earned that coveted title by failing at the most important task she ever had, and what she does in the wake of both that triumph and that failure. Read more…

 

MANIA – Interview by Pat Ferrara

Mania: In your own words what is Legacy of Wolves about?

Marcy: On the surface, it’s a murder mystery. People are dying in the Thranish city of Aruldusk, and my inquisitive – a dwarf named Greddark d’Kundarak – is hired to figure out who is doing the killing, and why. But the novel’s tagline is “We are all forged in the fires of our past,” and it’s also about the legacies our families leave us, how we can either choose to be defined by the past, or to break free of it, and what happens when we do, because it’s never as easy to walk away from our history as we think it’s going to be, and sometimes that history doesn’t want to be left behind and comes looking for us. Read more…

 

WIZARDS OF THE COAST – Interview by Mark Sehestedt

Wizards: What were the biggest influences on you as a writer?

Marcy: All the usual suspects — Tolkien, Howard, Lieber, Bradbury. But some newer voices, too, like Stephen R. Donaldson and Guy Gavriel Kay. And some you wouldn’t necessarily expect, like the Bronte sisters and Thomas Wolfe. And then there are the myriad Newbery Award winners I grew up reading — L’Engle, Alexander, Speare, Paterson. A good book stays with you long after you’ve put it back on the shelf, and there are stories I read over twenty years ago that still affect me today. That’s the sort of legacy (no pun intended) I hope to leave with my own writing. Read more…

 

© 2017 Marsheila Rockwell.